How are most young children poisoned?
Medicine
Cleaners
Poisonous Plants
Poison Prevention
Keeping your Child Safe from Poisons

Children from birth to age 5 are hospitalized due unintentional poisonings more than any other age group because they explore and learn by putting things in their mouth.

At this age, children have better coordination, balance and motor skills. Children at this age are also more curious about the unknown, and are able to open things more easily now. Even "child-proof" containers are really only child-resistant, which means they slow down the child from opening it by 15-230 seconds.

Children at this age are starting to understand rules, but they cannot always follow them or fully understand the consequences of breaking them. For example, sometimes when children are excited they can forget a safety rule. It is important to be aware of products that could be a poison to your child.

What is a poison?

Did you know that poisons are more than just cleaning supplies? A poison can be a drug or non-drug substance. A poison is something that can make you sick if you swallow it, taste it, smell it, get it on your skin or in your eye. A poison could be medicine meant for someone else or too much medicine, makeup, a plant, or a battery.

Make sure that poisons are stored in a high, locked cabinet or cupboard. Locking them up and keeping them high helps to keep poisons away from preschool children.

If you are in Nova Scotia or PEI and have a question about poison, the IWK Regional Poison Centre is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to take your call.

Call the IWK Regional Poison Centre at 1-800-565-8161.

If you are in New Brunswick, call 911.